HIP DISLOCATION

A traumatic hip dislocation occurs when an event pushes the head of the femur bone out of the socket in the pelvis bone. It tends to take a large amount of force in order to dislocate the hip joint such as motor vehicle accidents and falls from large heights. Due to the large amounts of force involved, hip dislocations tend to go hand in hand with other injuries such as sprains and broken bones.

Hip dislocations herald a serious medical emergency. Physicians urge patients to seek immediate treatment from the necessary medical professionals..

During a hip dislocation, the femoral head of the femur pushes either backwards or forwards out of the hip socket.

  • Posterior dislocation. With almost 90% of hip dislocations, the femur gets forced out of the socket backwards. Posterior hip dislocation leaves the lower leg in a static position, forcing the knee and foot to rotate inwards toward the centerline of the body.
  • Anterior dislocation. When the femur pushes out of the socket in a forward direction, the hip only bends slightly, and the knee and foot will rotate outwards away from the centerline of the body.

When dislocating the hip joint, damage will also tend to affect the ligaments, labrum, muscles, and other tissues as well. In addition, hip dislocations can also damage the nerves around the hip.