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TENOLYSIS

IF YOU HAVE TENOLYSIS, PLEASE SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH ONE OF OUR ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

Tenolysis Overview and Indicators

The Tenolysis procedure allows a tendon to break free from adhesions. Sometimes, injuries or surgery result in tendons becoming stuck, typically in the fingers where they would normally straighten or bend. This procedure, often performed on patients with reduced active range of motion, can enhance range of motion post-hand trauma. However, if passive flexion significantly surpasses active flexion after prolonged immobilization or if a finger becomes stiff, the patient may need a Tenolysis Procedure.

Non-Operative Tenolysis Procedures

Conservative management options, apart from Tenolysis exist. Occupational therapy techniques can break up adhesions to the tendon to improve tendon gliding and improve finger range of motion. Additionally, physicians can use Ultrasound-guided Hydrodissection as an alternative treatment after surgery or reoperation.

What are the risks and successes of Tenolysis

All procedures have some extent of risk. Risks for Tenolysis include loss of skin sensitivity in the finger, hand, or forearm, damage to the tendon itself and to the tissues surrounding the tendon. However, ninety percent of all surgeries have above average results. Furthermore, sixty percent of patients experience total recovery of mobility.

Tenolysis Surgery and Therapy

Surgeons typically perform Tenolysis as a day case procedure, using local, regional, or general anesthesia. During Tenolysis surgery, providers meticulously separate the tendons from their surrounding adhesions as needed. Surgical technique can include open surgery, Traction Tenolysis and Fine Wire technique. Open surgery involves opening the tendon sheath and sharply lysing the adhesions. Surgeons employ Traction Tenolysis, a technique that involves wrapping the affected tendon around a surgical tool and applying traction to break up the tendon adhesions. Finally, the Fine Wire technique involves the use of a thin wire to swiftly lyse adhesions with minimal irritation to surrounding tissues.

The recovery duration, which hinges on the extent of scar tissue and involved lysis of adhesions, ranges from four to six weeks and might necessitate hand therapy during the initial weeks post-surgery to optimize hand function and mobility. Some occupational therapists may also offer guidance on wound and scar management. Furthermore, patients who underwent Tenolysis surgery reported benefits from hand therapy, enabling them to fully optimize hand function and prevent recurrence.

 

Laurencin, Cato T. “Flexor Tenolysis.” Practice Essentials, Indications, Contraindications, Medscape, 31 Aug. 2023, emedicine.medscape.com/article/1238950-overview?form=fpf.

 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SPEAK TO AN ORTHOPEDIC HAND AND WRIST SPECIALIST IN DALLAS, FORT WORTH, OR THE LONE STAR STATE, GIVE US A CALL AT 817-697-4038, OR CONTACT US OVER THE WEB. TELE-MEDICINE APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE